ABOUT LACROSSE

Updated Sunday January 17, 2016 by Thunder Lacrosse.

WHAT IS LACROSSE?

Lacrosse is one of the oldest organized sports in North America. While at one point it was a field game or ritual played by FIRST NATIONS, it became popular among non-Aboriginal peoples in the mid-1800s. When the National Lacrosse Association of Canada was formed in 1867, it was the Dominion of Canada’s first governing body of sport. Lacrosse was confirmed as Canada’s official summer sport in 1994. The Canadian national lacrosse teams (men and women) rank highly in the world standings, both in field and box lacrosse.

Lacrosse is a team sport in which players pass, catch, and carry a rubber ball, using sticks with a netted pouch at one end. The object of lacrosse is to accumulate points by shooting the ball into the opposing team's goal. The early versions of the game involved large teams of Aboriginal warriors playing over a field that could be over a kilometre in length. Since that time, lacrosse has changed significantly, and there are now four distinct games in Canada: men's field lacrosse, women's field lacrosse, box lacrosse, and inter-crosse. (http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com/articles/lacrosse)

 

Thunder Lacrosse House League plays Box Lacrosse.

Box Lacrosse is played on a standard sized arena floor and features 6 players (goaltender and five runners) of an 18-20 player team on the floor at one time.

The strategy of Lacrosse is similar to that of basketball, with all five runners involved in the offense and the defense. Added to the appeal are the speed and excitement created by a 30 second shot clock. The combination of action and reaction makes Box as much fun to play as it is to watch.

Box Lacrosse is played almost exclusively in Canada, with annual National Championships occurring at seven levels. The award of the premiere junior (17-21) championship is the Minto Cup, while the best senior players in Canada (over 21) play for the Mann Cup.

There are currently over 47,000 Box players in Canada. Both males and females play this version of Lacrosse and the ages of competition range from 6-65 years. (Canadian Lacrosse Association www.lacrosse.ca)




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